Your Turn

This topic contains 8 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Jared Tschohl 1 year, 7 months ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #448

    Jill Sweeney
    Participant

    What are some ways in which we can help our students memorize and understand information and facts without having to drill and kill the information? Do you think that these methods would be as effective as the drilling of information?

    #471

    Sarah Reich
    Participant

    From past experiences, what did your teachers or you do as a teacher, to help students transfer knowledge to new situations? Was it effective?

    #472

    Anonymous

    Students can memorize and understand information through many different strategies other than drilling and killing. Songs, games, acronyms, and other “fun” learning experiences can be used to help students memorize essential information. I think in many cases, these can be just as effective as drilling and killing. It partially depends upon the subject and topic though.

    #473

    Anonymous

    I have seen teachers help students transfer information by incorporating the new knowledge into the old. If you previously talked about rocks, and now you are teaching natural selection, a teacher could explain fossils. The topic of fossils crosses over to include information about rocks, so a teacher could retouch upon that topic. You can also cross over subjects to reinforce knowledge. Using characters from a book you are reading for english in a math problem is a strategy that could be used.

    #474

    Sarah Reich
    Participant

    Like Courtney said, you can use methods like songs and other more fun learning techniques. Another fun game that is similar to “drilling” would be jeopardy. Students are still practicing the problems but as soon as it becomes a competition it becomes more fun to do them. With that said, for subjects like math I think that drilling is necessary. Eventually students needs to practice problems, no amount of singing will help them get to the math solution.

    #475

    Anonymous

    How can a teacher accomodate for practicing past learned information in addition to teaching new information? Should there be a emphasis on one more than another?

    #489

    Anonymous

    In Implications for Practice, Willingham says, “It is pretty boring to practice something if we’re not getting any better at it.” Do you have any ideas for creative activities that could be used as a form of drilling that engage students more than worksheets? My 2nd grade teacher would have us play “Around the World” every Friday to help us quickly practice our math facts.

    #496

    Jared Tschohl
    Participant

    Emily,

    I could argue that “Around the World” reinforces Willingham’s argument. “Around the world” or “Jeopardy” helps to create a divide between the higher and lower achievers or even just processors. What if I practice my multiplication facts every day for thirty minutes and “Julie” the smartest child in class already has her memorized? Every time I play “around the world” Julie beats me no matter how hard I practice. I now judge my efforts in that I am not improving, because if I was then I would beat “Julie” some of the time, but I don’t.

    Also, when you played “Around the world,” If you weren’t one of the two people who were head to head at that moment, were you focusing still on the facts OR were you off-task talking to a neighbor? What do the other 23 students in class due to stay engaged when only two people have to showdown with one another at a time?

    #497

    Jared Tschohl
    Participant

    My Question:

    As we have read this book, and many other texts, we always have “aha,” but I usually called them “will dug, of course doesn’t everyone know to do that” moments. Many teachers in the world are competent enough to recognize what best practice strategies are, but are not always willing to change what they have done for years.

    Why are teachers more stubborn than mules to step out of their comfort zones and make changes that they know will be more successful in the long run? Why are teachers content with contentedness and mediocrity?

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